MAPS 2020
Community Survey & Feedback

We have assembled information, analytics, resources links, and infographics to help educate and inform our Manistee community about the MAPS 2020 visioning process to provide a stable educational foundation, designed to support the needs of our students, families, businesses, and community for generations to come.

Community Facilities Forum Presentation

On April 25, 2019, Ronald Stoneman, Manistee Area Public Schools Superintendent, presented a Community Facilities Forum presentation outlining preliminary options for MAPS facilities vision for the future. View the presentation here, and share your thoughts by completing the Forum Survey.

 

MAPS 2020 Vision Forum Presentation

On September 5th & September 9th, 2019, Ronald Stoneman, Manistee Area Public Schools Superintendent, presented the MAPS 2020 Vision Forum outlining a plan for MAPS facilities vision for the future. View the presentation here.

 

MAPS 2020 Vision Forum Update

On October 8th, 2019, Ronald Stoneman, Manistee Area Public Schools Superintendent, held an updated MAPS 2020 Vision Forum presentation reviewing the plan and answering questions received through community feedback. View the presentation here, and share your thoughts by completing the Forum Survey.

We Value Your Feedback!.


Facilities Initiative Survey - Review the plan here, and give us your feedback by completing our short survey!

Please lend your voice to the MAPS 2020 Vision by participating in our survey.

  • Takes Less Than 5 Minutes
  • Facilities Future Focused
  • Invitation to share your ideas

Ask Ron

Below you will find answers to questions that have been asked of our Superintendent, Ron Stoneman about the MAPS 2020 visioning process. Have a question about MAPS 2020 visioning process or the district facilities? Please don’t hesitate to submit your questions for Ron following the link below.

Academics

Why are you focusing on facilities instead of academics?

As part of this visioning process, consistent efforts have been made throughout the MAPS district in assessing student progress through the resources of the Northwest Evaluation Association and incorporating data gathered into the creation of individualized student focused solutions and optimization of group instruction. With the recruitment of a dedicated Curriculum Director and the development a professional learning community our educators are engaged to share expertise and work collaboratively to improve teaching skills to impact the academic performance of students. MAPS provides our faculty with support, mentorship, and coaching for developing a consistent philosophy of education and K-12 developmental goals to meet desired outcomes for all students.

The MAPS 2020 Vision includes programmatic elements that reach beyond the bond scope and our physical environments. Our Social Emotional Learning (SEL) curriculum provides social and emotional programming within the academic curriculum to help our students learn about self-awareness, self-management, relationship building and other basic life skills. The intention is to address emotional and behavioral issues through a comprehensive, consistent approach at all grade levels, while also providing them with critical thinking, problem solving, and communication skills needed to be successful on any life path they choose.

Through a carefully considered balance of academic curriculum, technology, social and emotional programming, and well-planned and supportive learning environments we will enable our students to excel, while also providing a stable educational foundation within our community.

The Full MAPS 2020 Vision includes plans for:

  • Flexible & Collaborative Learning Spaces
  • Secure & Accessible Buildings
  • Educational Excellence through Professional and Curriculum Development
  • Supportive Culture for Students and Staff
  • Community Stability through Support of Economic Development Efforts
  • Operational Efficiency through Long-Term Facilities Planning
  • Expansion of Extracurricular Assets
  • Community Collaboration of Shared Resources
How does this plan support students interested in trades careers?

Vocational/Technical Trades today are addressed much differently than they were 20 to 30 years ago when schools had offerings such as wood shop and mechanics classes available onsite. Technology has developed these trades into highly technical careers that require trades experts and expensive equipment to teach the skills necessary to succeed in these fields.

In order to continue to meet the needs of these students, our Career Technical Education (CTE) program offers MAPS students the opportunity to earn articulated college credit through partnerships the district has with WSCC, as well as Ferris State, and other higher learning institutions. CTE opportunities provide our students with the academic and technical skills, knowledge and training necessary to succeed in their chosen career field.

How does MAPS educational programming provide resources for advanced students?

The MAPS district recognizes the diversity nature of how students learn. It is important that we incorporate resources for those students that are both excelling and those that need additional support to stay on track. For those students interested in advanced learning we offer the following options:

Advanced Placement Classes

Advanced Placement is a program run by the College Board (the makers of the SAT) that allows students to take courses at MAPS, for which they can earn college credit and/or qualify students for more advanced classes when they begin college.

The AP courses are designed to give the student the experience of an intro-level college class while still in high school, providing the challenge advanced students desire. They may even earn college credit for the class if they pass the AP exam with a qualifying score. Current AP courses offered at MAPS:

  • English (Composition)
  • Environmental Science
  • US History
  • Psychology
  • Calculus I
  • Computer Science
  • Chemistry

Dual Enrollment

Through a partnership with West Shore Community College, MAPS Students are able to apply for Dual Enrollment. This program allows high school students to enroll in college courses for credit while still in high school.

Learn More

Why is the academic curriculum focused so much on technology?

Our MAPS Campus offers a continuum of learning where students advance seamlessly through a Chippewa Journey of their own design. At the leading-edge of connected learning, MAPS provides the advantage of Power Learning, our one-to-one technology program, to provide every student with the tools necessary to connect with their world and create their own pathway for success.

Technology has been shown to transform learning by introducing in a new model of connected teaching. Technology links teachers to their students and provides expanded access to content, resources, and systems to help them improve instruction and personalize learning for the way a student learns.

Today’s world requires students to have strong technological skills regardless of their path for the future. As the job market evolves, so must our curriculum in order to provide relevant skills for advanced education and entering the workforce.

Financial 

Where can I learn more about MAPS budget and financial plan?
Why are we holding a fund balance when we have maintenance needs?

The MAPS district holds a fund balance (sometimes referred to as a rainy-day fund), which is set aside and allocated to cover district operations for emergencies and times when state or local revenues may be delayed or not available.

The Mackinaw Center for Public Policy Reports:

The Michigan School Business Officials organization recommends that districts maintain a fund balance of at least 15% of a district’s general fund expenditures. Based on data from Bulletin 1011 for fiscal 2006, the general fund balance after reserves and designations of conventional school districts and charter schools statewide was about 10.8% of total current operating expenditures, showing that many districts struggle to meet the recommendation.MAPS fund balance for the 2017-18 school year was approximately 20% of the total budget.

How did Proposal A change state school funding?

State Funding

Prior to Proposal A, schools were financed primarily through local property taxes. In 1993-94, Michigan home and business owners were paying on average 33 operational mills assessed on the State Equalized Value (50% of market value) of their properties. At that time, local taxation accounted for roughly 69% of the State/local split of school finance, with State funding making up the other 31%.

 

In July of 1993, the Michigan Legislature approved, and the Governor signed into law, P.A. 145 of 1993. This law exempted all real and personal property taxes for school operating purposes beginning in 1994. This law eliminated approximately 64% or $6.4 billion of $10.0 billion of total K-12 school funding beginning in FY 1994-95, requiring the Legislature to create a new funding structure.

 

Proposal A passed in March 1994:

  • Sales Tax Increased from 4% to 6%, with 100% of the Revenue from the Additional 2% Dedicated to the School Aid Fund (SAF);
  • Use Tax – All Revenue from the 2% Increase –SAF;
  • State Education Tax Assessed on the Taxable Value of all Property at 6 mills;
  • New Real Estate Transfer Tax – 0.75% applied to the selling price of the property;
  • Cigarette Tax – increase from 25 to 75 cents per pack, with 63.4% of the increase dedicated to the School Aid Fund. (August 1, 2002 saw a 50 cent increase, 20 cents of which was dedicated to the SAF. This tax increased again on July 1, 2004, to $2.00/pack; none of the 75 cent increase was dedicated to the School Aid Fund.)

 

Why don’t we just wait until the 1999 bond debt drops off?

Unfortunately, we do not have the luxury of waiting until 2029 when the current bond drops off. The facilities assessment that was conducted in 2018 has identified facilities infrastructure, maintenance and furnishings needs in excess of $48 million dollars over the next 10 years, if no changes are made to the current 4-building facilities configuration. With all 4 buildings remaining in service, that number jumps to 63+ million in 20 years.

With each year that passes, our buildings age and require additional maintenance. Approximately 91% of our annual budget is allocated to expenses directly related to educating our students, this leaves us with 9% of our budget for building operations and maintenance. In addition to covering everyday expenses such as general repairs, utilities, plowing, etc., from this budget we must also allocate for capital improvements for things like roof or window replacement, and furnishings upgrades. The budgetary allocation for the 2018/19 schools year provided approximately $1.3 million for operations and maintenance plus $328,000 to service debt from the 7 million dollars in maintenance and improvement work completed without incurring additional tax burden on our community. As you can see, our facilities needs are very quickly outpacing our budget.

How has School of Choice impacted the school district?

According to a National Bureau of Economic Research report, it was found that the degree of external competition that a school district faces from neighboring districts may also affect the efficiency of school spending and therefore housing values. This speaks to a more expansive concern to school districts and their surrounding communities regarding student retention in the face of the School of Choice option.

With the introduction of School of Choice in 1996, school districts were placed in the position of having to consider marketability for the first time. Over the last few years, MAPS SOC population is showing an upward trend in SOC transfers. Proving a margin exists for improvement.

In a competitive market, it becomes critical for school districts to identify what impacts decision making. Parents are measuring 21st Century learning amenities, test scores, academic offerings, extracurricular diversity, fiscal responsibility, social and behavioral supports, community pride, and more.

Manistee is compared with neighboring communities based upon development opportunities, as well as our educational, housing, and workforce assets.  In order to retain students and grow business and manufacturing in our county, we need to envision and invest in a future for our community that supports Manistee as a great place to live, work and raise a family.

What are the benefits of building consolidation?

Using an assessment of the current physical structures of district, we have evaluated our facilities needs over the next 20 years. Comparing operational expenses to facility need, we have developed a plan for efficient use and maintenance of our physical assets, ensuring sustainable and supportive learning environments for future Chippewas.

Additionally, we have taken into account how changes in enrollment may impact our district capacity and financial future. In the MAPS 2020 Vision, consideration has been given to the capacity of individual buildings, maintenance requirements of those buildings over the next 20 years, and student enrollment projections. The MAPS 2020 Vision aligns our facilities assessment findings with historic and projected enrollment figures to reconfigure current district assets.

Although the MAPS 2020 Vision bond scope cannot completely encapsulate all maintenance needs for all facilities for the next 20 years, we are confident that we have developed a plan that provides appropriately scaled learning environments for our student population, while also delivering efficient and affordable facilities the district can maintain well into the future, saving the district millions in maintenance and operational costs.

Potential Benefits include:

  • Operational efficiency
  • Buildings scaled to enrollment projections
  • Shared resources
  • Transportation efficiency
  • Improved financial stability
  • Reduced maintenance costs

Our Community

How do other regional district proposals compare to the Manistee proposal?

K-12 Investment in Neighboring Districts

Regional district investment chart

*Ludington and Cadillac bonds have passed, Benzie’s bond proposal will be voted on in November 2019.

How can our school district impact the Economic Development initiative happening in Manistee?

In 2011, Michael Walden is an economist at North Carolina State University, wrote an extensive report on the economic impact of public schools. He indicates one of the most important impacts of a school district on its local economy is from the “outputs” of schools such as the generation of successful graduates who will be more productive in the local economy and who impose fewer public costs by becoming less likely to engage in crime and drug use, and more likely to lead healthier, productive lifestyles.

Local Manistee community entities are working in collaboration with the Michigan Economic Development Corporation through the Rising Tide Initiative to identify how to improve the economic forecast of Manistee County by measuring which efforts will have the greatest long-term impact on economic concerns such as job stability, workforce development, and affordable housing. Manistee Area Public Schools works to ensure an educational foundation that is supportive of these efforts.

I don't have a student in the school district, why should I be concerned about schools?

FOUNDATION FOR A STRONG COMMUNITY

A strong community foundation includes the following elements:

  • Economic– Diverse, vital, and innovative business providing service and creating job opportunity.
  • Education– High-quality educational resources for lifetime learning.
  • Health & Wellness – Access to quality health care resources.
  • Neighborhood & Community – Provide housing and basic needs of residents, while creating a sense of pride and shared purpose.
  • Assets– Recreational, historic, and cultural assets for quality lifestyle.

EDUCATION FOR A STRONG COMMUNITY

Why education matters…

  • Supports stable property values
  • Attracts and keeps families in our community
  • Fosters economic development
  • Provides work force for area businesses
  • Develops students into productive citizens

Community Impact of Your School District

According to the National Bureau of Economic Research, there is a clear connection between school expenditures and home values. A report titled, “Using Market Valuation to Assess Public School Spending,” found that for every dollar spent on public schools in a community, home values increased by $20. These findings indicate that additional school expenditures may benefit everyone in the community, whether or not those residents actually have children in the local public-school system.


Insulating Property Values

In a 2009 study at Georgia Tech, the effects of the recession on housing values were studied to identify changes in the demand for certain characteristics of residential properties as the market was falling.

They analyzed home buying influencing characteristics such as bedrooms, bathrooms, square footage, age, stories, garage, basement, general interior and exterior, school district, crime stats, median income, etc.  The research discovered that a quality school district can have a profound insulating effect on the housing values in the surrounding community.

How could the approval of the Ludington Area School District millage effect the Manistee community?

Although we are in full support of the Ludington Area School District Safe & Modern Schools Plan, we are also keenly aware of the potential impact the district’s improvements could make on the Ludington community that neighbors our county. Educational resources are important to the economic strength of a community. Quality educational resources are a critical component in community selection for those considering future business and development opportunities.

Foundational Factors for a Strong Community

  • Economic – Diverse, vital, and innovative business providing service and creating job opportunity.
  • Education – High-quality educational resources for lifetime learning.
  • Health & Wellness – Access to quality health care resources.
  • Neighborhood & Community – Provide housing and basic needs of residents, while creating a sense of pride and shared purpose.
  • Assets – Recreational, historic, and cultural assets for quality lifestyle.

Additional consideration of neighboring educational assets is also a concern. According to a National Bureau of Economic Research report, it was found that the degree of external competition that a school district faces from neighboring districts may also affect the efficiency of school spending and therefore housing values. This speaks to a more expansive concern to school districts and their surrounding communities regarding student retention in the face of the School of Choice option.

With the introduction of School of Choice in 1996, school districts were placed in the position of having to consider marketability for the first time. Over the last few years, MAPS SOC population is showing an upward trend in SOC transfers. Proving a margin exists for improvement.

In a competitive market, it becomes critical for school districts to identify what impacts decision making. Parents are measuring 21st Century learning amenities, test scores, academic offerings, extracurricular diversity, fiscal responsibility, social and behavioral supports, community pride, and more.

Manistee is compared with neighboring communities based upon development opportunities, as well as our educational, housing, and workforce assets.  In order to retain students and grow business and manufacturing in our county, we need to envision and invest in a future for our community that supports Manistee as a great place to live, work and raise a family.

Why education matters to a community…

  • Supports stable property values
  • Attracts and keeps families in our community
  • Fosters economic development
  • Provides work force for area businesses
  • Develops students into productive citizens
Could MAPS work with the City on a park plan to ensure that we adequate practice fields and tennis courts?

MAPS administration is working in collaboration with City and County planners, the Sands Park Committee, our architecture and engineering contractors, and other associated recreational entities to determine how to meet the needs of both the district and the community, while maintaining a sound financial plan for stewardship of district assets. We will keep the community apprised of all developments as the activities of this collaborative group seek solutions.

Buildings

How will the district make safety of our students a priority in all buildings?

Safety of our students and staff is, and always has been, the focus of our attention. We have addressed safety in a multitude of ways and will continue to allocate resources to build upon these efforts. MAPS administration, staff, Board of Education, and our Student Safety Advisory Committee have work hard to formulate solutions for addressing safety concerns. The following is a summary of some of our recent progress in the area of safety:

Communication

    • Communication Matrix Developed and Implemented
    • Safety Communication and Resources Presented on Safety Page of Website
    • Efforts to Improve Communication Between District and Parents
    • Manistee Community Safety Committee Developed for Countywide Communication of Safety Standards

Buildings

    • Building Tours Completed/Identified Safety Improvement Opportunities
    • Grant Obtained for Safety Film at MMHS
    • Bus Protocols Implemented
    • Door Sensor Installation
    • Fingerprinting Standards Identified
    • Emergency Operation Procedures Reviewed and Revised

Education & Training

    • Social Emotional Learning Curriculums Reviewed
    • OK 2 Say Training
    • Stewards of Children Training
    • QPR Training
    • Student & Staff Opportunities
      • Opioid Symposium
      • Vaping Assembly
      • Homeland Security

Ongoing Initiatives

      • MMHS Safety Improvements to Entry – Budgeting for 2019/20 Project
        • Working with contractors to design improvements for front entrance and office areas
        • Create separation between student population and adults visiting the building
      • Door Sensor Installations
      • Bus Route Improvement
        • Schedules are being revised to accomplish 10-minute drop-off windows
      • Manistee Community Safety Committee – EOP Alignment
        • 763-page EOP document was presented for review
        • Standards are being finalized
      • CentraWellness at Madison
        • Madison will be the new location for the CentraWellness Autism & ADD Therapist
      • Jefferson Parent Visit to Ludington – Locked All Day Policy
        • Access & Entry procedure monitored at each building
        • Met with parent advisors to discuss in-building safety concerns
        • Visited Ludington to review Locked All Day procedures
        • Developing policy and procedure for keeping building locked at all times
        • Reviewed and discussed revised drop-off & pick-up procedures that will be implemented for 2019/20
      • MMHS Pick-Up & Drop-Off/Bus Route Improvement
        • Discussed opportunities for improving the transportation procedures at MMHS
        • Solutions implemented with Transportation Director
I thought taxpayers voted to pay for the removal of the old high school, why wasn’t the building torn down?

As you will see on our Facilities History timeline, the removal of the 1927 High School building was included in bond proposals in June of 1997, June of 1998, and August of 2011. All 3 of these bond proposals failed. The bond proposal that was passed in September of 1999, did not include the removal of this building.

Will the Jefferson building be torn down in this plan?

Yes, the proposed plan includes full demolition of the Jefferson building as well as the necessary site work to create an open park-like greenspace at the Jefferson site. The current playground equipment and parking lot will be maintained until a plan for that site has been further developed.

Couldn’t we just keep Jefferson and still improve Kennedy?

Renovating Kennedy Elementary while also budgeting for the estimated maintenance needs of Jefferson Elementary would be cost prohibitive to the District. Removing the Jefferson Building (the oldest of the 4 buildings currently online –built 1954) the district will save millions in anticipated maintenance for a building not needed to serve current enrollment forecasts.

*Maintenance cost come from MAPS General Fund Budget
** Capital Need based on Facility Assessment

Investing in our elementary with the best infrastructure allows the district to save $21.16 million over the next 20 years.

*Maintenance cost come from MAPS General Fund Budget

Have you considered closing Madison?

Through the process of facilities visioning, we have considered many options. Madison is an aging building, however the space available there has been put to great use. The former Madison Elementary School has undergone a repurposing plan which began after the building consolidation in 2017 and was recently was renamed: Madison Community Learning Center. Madison currently houses, MAPS Preschool, Great Start Readiness Program, MAPS After School Care, Face to Face Homeschool Program, Michigan Great Lakes Virtual Academy, is a resource for Manistee Intermediate School District, and most recently became the new location for the CentraWellness Autism & ADD Therapist.

In the proposed plan, with a reasonable investment to renovate space and mechanical services, the Madison Community Learning Center would be used as a community hub offering practical resources and innovative programs to meet the educational, health, social, and behavioral needs of students throughout our community as well as the location of our administrative offices.

The move of our administrative offices to Madison allows for the space needed at Kennedy to house all lower grades, Pre-K through 5 in one location.

Through the further development of collaborative community partnerships, we will endeavor to assist Manistee families with centralized, diverse resources to help them thrive and grow.

Why don’t you just create one campus at the MMHS site?

This option was evaluated as we worked through the process of identifying a potential vision for our facilities future. Considering land held by the district, and adjacent properties, it quickly became clear that there would not be adequate space to house all students in one location while also providing for safe and efficient means for parking and pick-up and drop-off procedures.

Is there a way to incorporate natural light in the 2nd grade classrooms at Kennedy?

There has been some concerned voiced about the configuration of the 2ndgrade classrooms on the lower level of the Kennedy Elementary building. Although there are no daylight windows in the 2ndgrade rooms, optimized lighting has been addressed from several angles. First, clerestory windows have been specified on the entry wall that will draw natural light from the center open group space, additionally 16’ ceilings and suspended cloud ceiling fixtures provide both upward and downward directed lighting to provide adequate light and visual height to the room.

Tower Pinkster, the architecture firm responsible for the design of the proposed plan, has created a 3D video walk-through of the 2ndgrade classrooms to provide the 2nd grade staff with a feel for the space created. Our intention with this plan is to provide adequate space with well planned amenities for all students and staff any all grade levels.

Planning

How is the MAPS district addressing SWOT results?

MAPS is focused on optimizing student success, is paying attention to the input from our internal and external stakeholders, and has deployed improvement strategies many areas:

Academics

  • Recruited a dedicated Curriculum Director in 2019.
  • Developed a professional learning community, which engages a group of educators to share expertise and works collaboratively to improve teaching skills and the academic performance of students.
  • Continued efforts are being made in assessing student progress through work with the NWEA and incorporating data gathered into the creation of student focused solutions for optimizing instruction.

Safety

  • Created the Student Safety Advisory Committee (SSAC) a community-based safety initiative team to research, devise, and inform the Board of Education regarding initiatives to improve safety.
  • Identified, applied for, and was awarded grant dollars to improve safety features of district assets. Additional opportunities are being continually sought.
  • Participating regularly in collaborative safety efforts with local law enforcement and neighboring districts to streamline response procedures
  • Leading student group initiatives focused on improved internal culture and positive decision making.
  • Ongoing participation of administration, staff, and students in local efforts and training for safety awareness initiatives.

 

Communication

  • Implemented outreach effort with internal and external stakeholders to better understand the perception, concerns, and desires of our community.
  • Assembled a staff leadership committee to lead internal culture development and proliferation.
  • Launched a new website focused on improvement of communication and robust and easily accessible resources.

 

Facilities Stewardship

  • Engaging in discussion with internal and external stakeholders to identify a 20-year vision for district facilities plan.
  • Identifying potential bond initiative to fund highest priority facilities needs.
  • Outlining 20-year strategy for maintaining existing district assets.
  • Maintaining the integrity of the operating budget while making infrastructure improvements for creatingsafe, secure, healthy and energy-efficient school in partnership with Honeywell Initiatives.
Why didn’t you just maintain the buildings we have?

Over the last 20 years, MAPS has strategically addressed maintenance needs and finances have been efficiently managed to address emergent facility projects. Over the last 20 years, MAPS has made significant improvements throughout the district based upon without additional tax burden on our community:

  • Improved Indoor & Outdoor Lighting
  • Upgraded Fire Alarm Systems
  • Installed Playground at Kennedy Elementary
  • Purchased New Busses
  • Boilers & Controls
  • Roofed all buildings
  • Added Security Cameras and Installed Door Monitoring Systems
  • Updated Classroom Technology
  • Upgraded Baseball, Softball, and Football Fields
  • Built Restroom & Concessions Building at Football Fields
  • Repaired & Expanded Parking Lots
  • Built Community Track
  • Built Paine Aquatic Center

Perhaps the greatest concern when considering this question is the long-range cost to maintain our facilities and how the current configuration will serve our population as it declines. Enrollment is projected to decrease by more than 30% over the next 20 years. As enrollment declines, so will school funding. The impact of maintaining numerous aging buildings, not operating at capacity, would create a significant financial burden on the district.

Is daycare being considered in this plan?

This proposed plan would relocate MAPS Pre-School and the Great Start Learning Program from Madison to the renovated Kennedy building. MAPS offers Pre-K programming for children ages 3 to 5. Interest has been expressed for our district to expand services for children 0 to 3. The programming and expense for such a consideration is a major undertaking and requires collaborative efforts of many community organizations to determine the best course of action. MAPS is committed to having these conversations, better understanding the needs of our community, and becoming a partner in a solution to serve young families.

Will this plan allow for growth if our population was to boom?

The school buildings are scaled to ensure adequate space for both current and projected enrollment. The new Kennedy Elementary classroom configurations are designed to accommodate 120 per grade, we are currently averaging 79 to 105 students per elementary grade. If, in the future, our district shows growth in enrollment, the property of both the Kennedy building and the MMHS site are both able to accommodate for expansion on all grade levels.

How do our class sizes compare with other districts in our county?

MAPS district averages a 20:1 student to teacher ratio. The other districts within the Manistee Intermediate School District are as follows:

Bear Lake 25:1
Kaleva Norman Dickson 22:1
Onekama 21:1

FOCUS AREA PRIORITIES – TOP RESPONSES

All of the information contained in the toggles below are the raw data points gathered from the various forums held to date.  The MAPS 2020 site will continue to build on these sections as more groups throughout our community are approached.


The Top Responses outlined below are a summary of the top priorities identified from ALL discussions.


  • Collaborative/flexible/more space/small group accommodations
  • Improved parking/pick-up & drop-off
  • Auxiliary/dedicated gyms
  • Safe entrances to buildings
  • Electrical/tech improvements/smart boards
  • Voctech/maker’s space
  • Improved furnishings/flexible seating
  • HVAC improvement
  • Natural light/windows/lighting improvement
  • Early childhood facilities
  • Plumbing improvement/ bath, sinks, drinking fountains in room

Feedback Collected from Facilities Forums

Overall SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats Exercise) Summary - February 2017

 QUALIFICATION TO DISPLAY ON OVERALL SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities & Threats Exercise)

October 2016 through January 2017, 120 one-on-one internal and external stakeholder interviews were conducted to inform a SWOT analysis. The interview answers have been compiled to formulate this “Overall SWOT Summary”. To appear on this SWOT summary, similar answers must have been given across 40% or more of the designed cross section. The findings contained here are a general summation of answer groups.

 
STRENGTHS                   
  • Wide Range of Curriculum Choices/Advance Placement/Dual Enrollment
  • Elementary Reading Program/Reading & Math Interventions
  • SpecialEducation
  • Adventure Learning
  • Diverse Athletic and Extra Curricular Offerings
  • Band Program
  • Quality,Specialized Instructional Staff/Administration
  • High School Facility, Pool, and Football Stadium
  • Technology/1:1Program/Student Centric Power Learning
  • Fiscal Management
  • Student Relationships/Diversity/Tolerance/Social Opportunities for Students
  • Superintendent Involvement on State Level
  • Ability to Monitor/Assess Student Progress(NWEA,PowerSchool)
  • PLC*
  • Love andLogic*

* Not mentioned by external survey

 
WEAKNESSES
  • Communication Internally & Externally
  • Social-Emotional Needs of Students
  • Responding to Changing Demographics
  • Programming for Non-College Bound Students
  • Internal Culture
  • Initiative Overload/Layering Tasks/Change of Direction/Goals
  • Age and Functional Obsolescence/Elementary Buildings
  • Challenge of Meeting the Needs of All Students
  • Aftermath of Inconsistent Leadership/Changes
  • Community & School Spirit
  • Morale andStress
  • Articulation and Unification of Vision and Goals
  • Collaborative Internal Process
  • Test Scores
  • Disconnect on some issues between Administrators and Instructional Staff

 

OPPORTUNITIES
  • Engagement with Community/Community Partnerships
  • IncreasedParental and Family Involvement
  • Grants/Growth of Endowment Funds with MCCF
  • Cultivate Ambassadors
  • Collaboration/Offerings Provided for District Schools
  • Creating/Providing a Day Care Program
  • Extend Use of Facilities
  • Bond Proposal for Facilities
  • Board Development
  • Strategy for Communications/Public Relations
  • DevelopingTechnical and Trade Programs

 

THREATS
  • State and Federal Funding/Sources of Revenue
  • Legislative Changes Ongoing with Curriculum/Standards
  • Competition for Students/Declining Enrollment
  • Demographics/Deteriorating Socio-Economic Level
  • Continuing Recruitment of Quality Teachers
  • Legislative Changes Ongoing with Curriculum/Standards
  • Litigation
MAPS Staff Meeting - November 2018

MAPS Staff Meeting 11/20 – 41 participants

 

 

 

 

 

Internal Highest Priority Items Identified

Q1

Q2

Q3

Total by building

Total

1. Collaborative/flexible/more space/small group accomodations

 

 

 

 

63

General

11

19

1

31

 

MMHS

11

5

0

16

 

Kennedy

8

5

0

13

 

Jefferson

2

1

0

3

 

2. Improved parking/pick-up & drop-off

 

 

 

 

37

General

15

0

0

15

 

MMHS

7

2

0

9

 

Kennedy

7

1

0

8

 

Jefferson

3

2

0

5

 

3. Auxiliary/dedicated gyms

 

 

 

 

32

General

11

3

6

20

 

MMHS

6

3

0

9

 

Kennedy

0

1

0

1

 

Jefferson

1

1

0

2

 

4. Safe entrances to buildings

 

 

 

 

30

General

9

1

5

15

 

MMHS

7

1

0

8

 

Kennedy

3

0

0

3

 

Jefferson

2

2

0

4

 

5. Electrical/tech improvements/smartboards

 

 

 

 

22

General

9

4

0

13

 

MMHS

2

0

0

2

 

Kennedy

4

1

0

5

 

Jefferson

1

1

0

2

 

6. Votech/maker’s space

 

 

 

 

21

General

4

1

2

7

 

MMHS

2

12

0

14

 

Kennedy

0

0

0

0

 

Jefferson

0

0

0

0

 

7.. Improved furnishings/flexible seating

 

 

 

 

21

General

10

0

1

11

 

MMHS

3

2

0

5

 

Kennedy

3

0

0

3

 

Jefferson

1

1

0

2

 

8. HVAC improvement

 

 

 

 

17

General

7

2

1

10

 

MMHS

5

0

0

5

 

Kennedy

0

1

0

1

 

Jefferson

1

0

0

1

 

9. Natural light/windows/lighting improvement

 

 

 

 

17

General

6

2

0

8

 

MMHS

2

0

0

2

 

Kennedy

5

0

0

5

 

Jefferson

1

1

0

2

 

10. Day care facilities

 

 

 

 

13

General

4

4

4

12

 

MMHS

0

1

0

1

 

Kennedy

0

0

0

0

 

Jefferson

0

0

0

0

 

11. Plumbing improvement/ bath, sinks, drinking fountains in room

 

 

 

 

13

General

8

0

0

8

 

MMHS

1

0

0

1

 

Kennedy

2

0

0

2

 

Jefferson

2

0

0

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAPS Staff Professional Development - December 2018

Staff Professional Development Presentation 12/18

 

Cards Collected

82

 

 

Presentation/Information Quality

 

History helpful and presented well

44

Show renderings of plans for district, help visualizing district options

2

Excellent process for educating internal stakeholders

2

Teachers feel they are a part of the process

1

Much better process than what happened in past

1

Was very familiar with history

1

Information was general, not about our district

1

 

 

Content Concerns

 

Reality of affordability

2

Staff feels admin already has a plan and their input won’t matter

1

 

 

Requests for Additional Information/Next Steps

 

Long term budgeting/maintenance plans needed

7

More focus on elementary

5

Operating cost information needed

4

Keep collecting input

2

Collect input from students

2

Wants to share more input

2

Ready to see what happens next

2

Washington School sale?

1

Wants to see a future timeline for next 10 years

1

Teacher opportunity to give input on workflow in new spaces

1

Wants more information about building reno vs. new building

1

More info on past failed bonds

1

 

 

Community Engagement

 

Need to educate/involve community/make history easy to understand

14

Concern for public support

1

Misconception about building removal

1

Engage community to use facilities, advertise at events

1

 

 

Focus Area Feedback

 

Focus areas identified are good

30

Gym needs to be a high priority

5

K-5 bathrooms in classrooms/use as shelters

3

Kitchen, cafeteria flow

2

Doors locked consistently/increased security at all entrances

2

Safe learning environment needed for elementary

2

Age appropriate playgrounds

2

Separate space for Middle & High School

1

Stairs at Kennedy need to be removed

1

Replace lockers

1

Improved use of space

1

Gathering place for kids before school

1

Individualized education

1

Large egress windows in classrooms

1

Media tech centers needed for growing demands

1

Loves library collaboration idea

1

Bullet proof glass

1

Green spaces with seating

1

Safety procedures needed

1

New buildings needed

1

Day care required to bring in new families

1

Air quality and circulation

1

Daycare is a strange idea

1

Washers and dryers

1

Central air

1

Showers

1

Separate space for science rooms

1

Sound system

1

Puppy room for teachers

1

Combine K-5

1

Exit door to outside from every classroom

1

ID and backgrounds for every person coming into buildings, way to identify visitors

1

 

 

General Feedback

 

Improvements need to be made for students to show respect/pride

2

Volunteering to speak

2

Site visit of renovated school needed

1

LRCR needs to contribute more in the community

1

Better quality of life needed in Manistee

1

Bond is needed

1

Site visit of renovated school needed

1

 

 

MAPS Supporters Forum - December 2018

SSAC/ATP/Boosters Presentation Feedback 12/19

# responses

 

 

Question #1  – Building improvements to support safety

 

Improve front entry procedures

5

More than just buzzers at the doors, cameras, alarms, security systems

4

Visitor enter into secured area

2

Safety glass on all exterior windows

1

Security throughout building, classrooms, open spaces

1

Random strangers less of a concern than those who know the school routines

1

Too much burden on secretaries to oversee all building traffic and navigate concerns

1

Better lockdown procedures for secondary entrances

1

 

 

Question #2 – Facility improvements to support diverse educational goals

 

More vocational ed opportunities, hands on learning

5

Teach life skills

2

Collaborative/flexible learning spaces

2

Team/group learning to teach how to work in business environment

1

Promote positive culture for students and faculty

1

Upgrade classrooms with current technology

1

Alternative classroom settings for students who cannot function in P.S. groups

1

“Safety net” for near drop-outs/frequent suspensions

1

College not the only working goal

1

Is there a plan for a K-12 campus?

1

Build relationships with community, businesses, WSCC

1

Larger classrooms to accommodate larger class sizes – one teacher with several aides to work in small groups

1

 

 

Question #3 – How to strengthen community support

 

More information provided to parents and public, ie: history piece

3

Share information about budgeting for building improvements vs. new build

1

Reps are welcome to present at monthly ISD meeting

1

Have many more conversations like tonight’s presentation (businesses, Chamber, tribe, human services groups)

1

Mental health “clinic” in school building

1

Leverage resources within community vs. spending money to duplicate efforts

1

Utilize existing spaces for fine arts events, meetings, pool, community events

1

Build partnerships with the parochial schools and home schoolers

1

Community center parenting classes

1

Adult Ed classes

1

Early childhood family education

1

Drug/alcohol education programs

1

Nutrition/cooking classes – real kitchens

1

Offer regular dinners combined with family educational opportunities

1

Food pantry, clothing share programs in schools

1

Rent facilities for adult sports

1

 

 

Board of Education Presentation - January 2019

Board of Education Presentation Feedback 1/19

# responses

 

 

Question #1 – How do you feel that the staff priorities identified align with the objectives of the MAPS Board of Education?

 

Priorities align

3

Staff should not have to focus on facilities needs because of past failed bonds

1

New Fresh learning spaces are pinnacle to district survival and ability to compete

1

Safety

1

Space

1

Fixtures

1

 

 

Question #2 – What facility improvements do you feel would best support our District’s goals for students at every stage of their educational journey?

 

Open, multi-purpose areas

2

HVAC and security improvements at elementary

1

Elementary improvement as focus

1

Makers space for all levels of learning

1

Better lighting, windows

1

Major remodel of Jefferson or new facility

1

Make adjustments to MMHS to maximized learning environment

1

Board always strive to listen to staff needs

1

Question #3 – How can our facilities better serve the needs of the greater Manistee community, and how can we use this opportunity to strengthen community support?

 

Increase access to after-hours activity & meeting space, track access

3

Increase participation w/WSCC & Baker with space in Manistee

1

Inviting fitness facility separate from learning would keep district focus on pride

1

Safe entrances

1

Outreach efforts to bring the community into the schools

1

 

 

Community Forum Presentation - April 4, 2019
Forum Presentation Feedback  4-4-19# responses
 21
Question #1  – What improvements do you feel are most important for meeting the diverse educational needs of our students? 
Flexible learning spaces to allow movement/space for small group instruction6
Voctech opportunities3
Adequate facilities with improved technology2
Environmentally sound HVAC2
Get rid of 1927 building2
Support/$ Teachers with supplies needed1
Life skills and social studies/humanities for well-rounded students1
Better teacher to pupil interactions1
Age appropriate improvements to facilities/smaller class sizes1
Safe buildings1
Common expectations1
AP Classes1
Classroom storage/shelving1
Natural light1
Bring back HOST program1
New functioning building1
Do it right the first time even if it has to be phased1
Teacher education for individualized learning1
K-6 one school1
Community does not want to invest in voodoo projects/old high school should have been removed with last bond1
Faciilities that support new learning1
Dedicated counselors1
Safe learning environment1
Fiscal responsibility1
 1
Question #2 – With student safety being a top priority, what are your thoughts about potential buildings improvements to promote safety? 
Improved drop-off & pick-up procedures/bussing & parking procedures7
Barriers to entry/limited access entry7
Behavior prevention/psychological support2
New building with safety improvements2
Door supervision with the buzzer system1
Fast response procedures1
Continue SSAC1
Continue community communication1
Doors that shut properly1
Light at Maple & 12th — 2 hours daily, M/F (with City & MCC)1
Cut 2 exit doors from Varsity locker rooms to secure H.S. from Pool1
Addition HS locker rooms1
Upgrades to facilities to meet current codes1
Upgrade security ASAP1
Educate students/standard expectaions1
Monitored surveillance on all entrances1
Improved safety practices1
 1
Question #3 – In what ways can the MAPS district support the needs of our community? 
Collaborative use of facilities/ Community use of pool, gyms, classrooms, media area, after-school learning 4
Continuing ed/Adult ed2
Skilled trades education2
Take care of our current facilities, pool, track, by putting $ aside each year so the full $$ can be spread out 1
Private fundraising1
Community meeting spaces1
Improved varied learning environments1
Contact with local businessess/apprenticeships/internships1
After-school mentoring1
Better psychological support1
Communicate plans with commiunity1
Cooperation with Community College1
Place-based learning1
Infant/pre-school/day care1
Bring generations together for events and activities1
Space for homless families to receive support and resources1
Use $ to preserve, maintain, and decay in current buildings1
Food, clothing, support services1
Community outreach1
Community collaborations/shared resources1
 1
Community Forum Staff Presentation - April 25, 2019
Communiity Forum Staff Presentation Feedback 4/25/19# responses
 26
Question #1  – Which option (A,B,C) do you feel best supports the direction of our MAPS 20/20 Vision?  
Option C 18
Option B6
Option A 
Question #2 – Our list of desired improvements has been established through feedback. Which improvements do you feel are most important for creating supportive learning environments for our students?                                                                                    
Safety in buildings//safe entrances17
21st century learning10
Improved parking/pick-up & drop-off 10
Auxillary gym space 7
HVAC5
Day care/early childhood / before school care4
Natural Lighting4
Loss of athletic field at Kennedy is a concern3
Improved furnishings2
Electrical improvements2
Plumbing 2
Voctech2
2 playgrounds1
Improved PA systems in all buildings1
Question #3 – What can be done to build community support for our vision? 
Educate voters to build trust4
Educate reguarding community relevance/benefits  (property,  maintenance, improvents)3
Teacher support1
Share/talk1
Social Media/Talk to Real Manistee1
Adjust proposal to appeal to older crowd1
Community mindset is great1
Present united front1
Networking1
Honesty & Transparency1
  
Community Forum Presentation - April 25, 2019

Communiity Forum Presentation Feedback 4/25/19

# responses

 15

Question #1  – Which option (A,B,C) do you feel best supports the direction of our MAPS 20/20 Vision? 

 

Option C – Most affordable

8

Option B

3

Option A

0

Laura’s question about the life of B vs C is a good question.

1

Have you considered closing Madison?  

1

I think there is a mixture of the three that may be the best solution.  Look at the $8.3mm at MMHS, keep MMHS full, and lower (?)  the footprint in all other places.

Some combination of B & C.  How do Madison & Jefferson compare?  Would Madison be a better rec site? Let community focus on rec & develop vision for rec

D — None of the above.  Must cost less until bond payment has been paid off in 2029.

1

Make Jefferson green space

1

Question #2 – Our list of desired improvements has been established through feedback. Which improvements do you feel are most important for creating supportive learning environments for our students?                                                                                   

Safety in buildings//safe entrances

6

21st century learning

5

Improved parking drop off (@ MMHS. Have students park in student parking)

5

Improved furnishings

2

Auxillary gym space & sport facilities; practice fields

2

Day care/early childhood 

1

The list hits them all!

1

Bus garage

1

Plumbing facilities

1

Clean classrooms/bathrooms

1

Voctech

1

Greenspace

1

Less tech, more traditional teaching

1

Electric tech improvement

1

Question #3 – What can be done to build community support for our vision?

 

Continuing to reach out to the community with open discussions like this.  

2

Welcoming feedback and keeping them informed on the process.

1

Community collaboration and building trust

1

Community support for vision?  Get all potential “yes” votes (all parents!)

1

Parent involvement

1

New elementary school and make Jefferson green space.

1

Include Community Forum presentation at beginning of year school events (welcoming new parents, handbook review, etc.)

CentraWellness on campus. 

1

Add dedicated WSCC voctech space on campus. 

1

Get the word out!!  Attending events such as Business After Hours, RisingTide meetings, etc. 

1

Have dedicated money to use for marketing the bond

1

Teacher/staff need to be on the same page together and be positive in asking for options.

1

Take down 1927 HS first (soon)

1

Present realistic plans, more transparency, show more details not marketing fluff.

1
  

Need More Information?

Location: 550 Maple St, Manistee, MI 49660 | Map
Telephone:
231-723-3521
Central Office Hours:
M-F: 8:30am – 4:30pm

Superintendent: Ron Stoneman
Email: rstoneman@manistee.org